I deeply appreciated reading about your visit to Nazi concentration camps, and your personal reflection on the senseless murders of Jews and blacks by white supremacists in Pittsburgh and Kentucky.

Your column was especially timely. Last Friday marked the 80th anniversary of Kristallnacht, the night when Nazis unleashed a series of violent pogroms against the Jewish population of Germany and the occupied territories of Austria and Czechoslovakia. In the immediate aftermath, the Nazis arrested about 30,000 Jewish men, the first instance in which Jews were incarcerated on a massive scale simply because of their ethnicity.

Your column also hit close to home. My late cousin, Larry Gladstone, was a slave laborer during the Holocaust. After his liberation from Mauthausen, Larry attended college in El Paso, became a physician and returned to his adopted community to raise a family and practice medicine for over 30 years.

Dr. Gladstone’s contribution to the community spread beyond his practice. He set up El Paso’s first coronary care unit, volunteered at a clinic in Segundo Barrio and remained active in the medical community following his retirement from private practice.

The El Paso Holocaust Museum documented Larry’s life experiences, along with the remarkable stories of other local survivors. Some of Dr. Gladstone’s materials can even be accessed online at www.elpasoholocaustmuseum.org/dr-larry-gladstone

Now, more than ever, it is important to remember.

- Stuart Blaugrund

El Paso

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