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Few financial advisers are handicapping the race between President Trump and Joseph R. Biden Jr., but they are providing counsel on what taxpayers should do (or not do) to prepare for next ye

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This year, Robinhood and its millions of younger-than-average customers have found themselves at the center of attention that is comic and tragic.

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WASHINGTON — The Justice Department said Thursday it had charged 57 people with trying to steal more than $175 million from the Paycheck Protection Program to help small businesses during the coronavirus pandemic as questions swirled about how its funds were disbursed.

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Elizabeth Cuthrell, a Manhattan-based film producer, used to work in an ergonomic office space: comfortable desk chair, monitor at eye level, external keyboard. Then came COVID-19. During stay-at-home she worked on a laptop from a wicker chair, or sometimes on a couch with “cushions like mar…

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You’ve put aside money for college in a 529 account for years. Now it’s time to start withdrawing funds to pay the higher-education bills. What’s the best way to do that?

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Impact investments, which aim to promote a social good or prevent a social ill, have significantly outperformed traditional bets during the coronavirus pandemic. And their returns are enticing hesitant investors to rework their portfolios.

At this point in the year — and the pandemic — the desire to escape to a place far away might be overwhelming. Even with so many borders closed, podcasts can transport you elsewhere, making them a good alternative to real, out-of-the-house travel. Here’s a collection of audio experiences tha…

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WASHINGTON — The Army is expanding its investigation into the killing of a female soldier to include the entire chain of command at Fort Hood, after both male and female soldiers described a culture of sexual harassment and bullying that they said had been ignored by the leadership of the sp…

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Students at some for-profit career schools could end up paying hefty interest charges when using a credit line offered by PayPal, a group of consumer watchdog groups warned this week.

The Great Recession demolished jobs across the U.S., and it eventually came for mine, too. After graduating in 2009, I worked four months as an entry-level executive assistant at a nonprofit before being laid off.

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     College students are used to seeing fees on their semester bills: activity fees, lab fees, athletic fees, technology fees, orientation fees and so on.

On what feels like day 10,572 of the pandemic, I have a confession to make: The Gray household is quickly exhausting its kidtainment reserves.

WASHINGTON — As President Donald Trump fumed in 2018 over the progress his government was making on a border wall, an Air Force veteran’s pro-wall GoFundMe page transformed into a separate project, funded by private donations and guided by former Trump advisers, including Steve Bannon.

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As public school teachers, Tori Smith and her husband have careers that should survive the coronavirus economy, but their mortgage lender wasn’t taking any chances.

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Students and their families often focus on tuition and fees when budgeting for college. But there are costs that typically don’t appear on college bills, and they can add up — costs like books, laptop computers, transportation, off-campus housing and meals.

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When the pandemic was declared in March and the U.S. stock market plunged, Dr. Bryan T. Whitlow was surprisingly sanguine about his retirement investments. Unlike many Americans, he didn’t radically cut his spending, check his balances constantly and yank money from the market.

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Telemedicine is having its moment. Over the last few months, millions of people have relied on video or telephone calls to talk to their doctors. But as the pandemic moves across the United States, and eventually recedes in some places, how long will the moment last?

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This week some good news! El Paso Inc. is thrilled to announce the 2020 Women of Impact.

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Your phone alarm goes off at 6 in the morning. You check some news sites and Facebook. It’s bad news after bad news. Coronavirus cases keep climbing, and so do deaths. Children can’t go back to school. Your favorite restaurant and barbershop are still closed. People are losing their jobs.

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Andrew D. Hendry rose through the corporate ranks to become the vice chairman and general counsel for Colgate-Palmolive, the global consumer products company. As a lawyer, he understood complicated legal documents and how they guided the inner workings of a large corporation.

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From minutes after the shooting, until today – one year later – behavioral health has remained at the forefront of our community’s response to the horrific events of Aug. 3, 2019; when a lone gunman opened fire in a crowded store and forever changed the fabric of our community.

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One day in April, as the coronavirus ravaged New York City, 24-year-old Isabelle Rodriguez composed a tweet she would send from the grave.

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Dan Feder, a graphic designer, and his husband, Don Bacigalupi, a museum director, have lived in the Hancock Park neighborhood of Los Angeles for two years. But they started looking to move closer to their teenage son’s school when pandemic lockdowns showed they could avoid a commute across …

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Update: Cinemark has announced the phased reopening of its theaters nationwide. Among those opening Friday, July 30, with new safety protocols is the Cinemark 20 and XD theater at Las Palmas Marketplace in Far East El Paso. It will show "comeback classics," including "Jurassic Park," "Raider…

John C. Bogle, founder of the Vanguard Group, had a mantra throughout his long career in the mutual fund industry: “Costs matter.” The amount of fees you pay to a third party to manage your money eats into your retirement savings. That has never been more important, although it is probably n…

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With so many people becoming unemployed in the pandemic-induced recession, we have no choice but to handle our technology differently. Put another way: We need to make our tech last longer.

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In some American neighborhoods, it’s hard to spot even one person outside without a face covering. In others, your odds of seeing many maskless people are quite high.

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In 2014, there were 211 homicides in the city of Baltimore. The following year, there were 342, an astonishing increase of 62%. The murder rate has barely budged since.

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High school and college students whose summer jobs fell through because of the pandemic may qualify for jobless benefits under a special federal program. But getting the funds is harder in some states than in others.

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Most American office workers are in no hurry to return to the office full time, even after the coronavirus is under control. But that does not mean they want to work from home forever. The future for them, a variety of new data shows, is likely to be workweeks split between office and home.

Colin Kaepernick will be featured in a documentary series produced by ESPN Films as part of a first-look deal with The Walt Disney Co.

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Employers brought back millions more workers in June as businesses began to reopen across the country. But the recent surge in coronavirus cases is threatening to stall the economic recovery long before it has reached most of the people who lost their jobs.

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Teenagers face a tough summer job market because of the pandemic and the related economic slowdown. Whether they’re lifeguard shifts at a (now-dry) pool or counselor spots at a (shuttered) summer camp, jobs often held by young people are scarce.

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The coronavirus and the related drop-off in travel have pummeled the rental car industry. That means car shoppers may find deals on used vehicles this summer as the rental companies trim their fleets — but not necessarily bargain-basement discounts.

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A few weeks ago, some creep tried to use my credit card number to buy stuff on Amazon — the second time this happened to me in a year.

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Having enough cash on hand to pay the bills is always a good idea. But in an economic crisis like this one, with millions unemployed and thousands of businesses in trouble, it’s more desirable than ever.

American policing is going to emerge changed from this June of protest. The question is whether it will be altered for the better. So let’s consider three possible scenarios for change — one building on the current system, another more ambitious but also riskier, and a third to be avoided at…

WASHINGTON — The Federal Reserve painted a sober picture of the economy Friday, declaring that the financial system remains under stress because of the coronavirus pandemic and that the path back to steady growth and a strong labor market is unsure.

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