The familiar yet mysterious face of the Dame of the Dead – la catrina, the iconic symbol of Día de los Muertos – recently took center stage at the El Paso Museum of Art.

As part of its Day of the Dead celebration, the museum displayed its Catrina Village of more than 80 intricate catrinas through Saturday, Dec. 30.

The village was handcrafted by an artisan collective from Michoacán, Mexico, and featured wood and clay figurines beautifully and meticulously beaded and hand painted. Several life-sized catrinas were part of the exhibit.

Mexican illustrator José Guadalupe Posada in the early 1900s created and popularized the catrina in a sketch of a dapper skeleton wearing a big, flowered hat. 

The catrina has long been a symbol of the Nov. 1-2 Mexican holiday where families honor their deceased relatives and welcome their souls to the living world for the day.

Information: epma.art

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