Subscribers will begin to receive El Paso Inc.’s Book of Lists this weekend.

Don’t fret if you don’t get yours today. It takes us about three weeks to get them out to all subscribers.

We have been publishing the Book of Lists since 2003. I’d like to tell you it was an original idea, but business journals around the country publish lists similar to ours. We knew El Paso would benefit from having it, and it was a no-brainer to add to our mix of publications.

The book is an annual snapshot of El Paso’s businesses, industries and nonprofits. It’s a directory that compiles more data than any other available around the city. The lists in the book were prepared throughout 2018. We update one list or more each week and include it in El Paso Inc.’s Your Money/C Section. Those weekly lists are aggregated for the book.

There are always a handful of lists that are in the middle of their annual updates while the book is at the printer. If we caught up with you on a listing recently, you will not see those updates reflected in the book. They will appear in the weekly print version and next year’s book. And they are always available online. The digital edition is $75 and includes the latest updates. It’s delivered as a digital download with each list on a simple spreadsheet. We even offer individual lists for purchase if you do not need the entire package.

We know that many organizations use the book for a variety of reasons – everything from recruiting business to El Paso to arming sales forces with prospects and leads.

We use it for our business, too. Last week, I pulled up the ZIP code demographic list to help us chart out our magazine distribution plans for 2019.

Readers are important contributors to the lists. Many lists have improved with your insight. Maybe you know something about an industry that we don’t. You can make recommendations on how to modify a list, or where to obtain new information so it reflects an industry more accurately.

We are also always open to ideas for new lists and want to hear from you when we miss the mark.

As we were putting the book together, I headed back to the storage shelves to take a look at some of the covers over the last 16 years. The cover shots let us flex a creative muscle and think outside of the news drumbeat. We brainstorm current developments and their visual appeal, but we also talk about other scenes that reflect El Paso. Often if there’s something that really defines a year and is photogenic, we go with it.

Seven of the last 17 covers have featured Downtown El Paso. Our very first cover was a Downtown cityscape. If only we knew then it would foreshadow Downtown revitalization and development and this year’s cover, the El Paso Streetcar.

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